ForceField® Security (AS 5039-2008)

ForceField has been through every security test in the book – and passed them all with flying colours. The Australian Standards test (AS 5039-2008) consists of six separate tests that all have to be passed by the same test sample...so it adds up to quite severe punishment. Have a look at the results below – presented in the sequence in which the tests were carried out.

Dynamic impact test

The Test

The dynamic impact test is designed to simulate an intruder trying to kick his way through a security door or window. The test is performed with a bag full of lead shot and sand, weighing more than 40 kg. The bag is smashed into the security screen with a force of 100 joules. The test is repeated 5 times. View video.

The Result

Passed. The dynamic impact test is not much of a challenge for a ForceField® security door or window. During cyclone testing ForceField® has survived more than 16 times the force.

Your Benefit

You will always feel secure behind a ForceField® security screen. It passes the Australian Standard for dynamic impact with ease – it has withstood forces that no human could apply.

Jemmy test

The Test

The jemmy test is designed to simulate an intruder using a lever to get past the security door or window. The test is performed with a large screwdriver at all locking, hinging and fastening points. The force applied is up to 450 N (45 kg) for 20 seconds – way beyond the capability of most potential intruders. View video.

The Result

Passed. The dynamic impact test left no gap to insert the screw-driver, so the jemmy test couldn’t even be performed on the ForceField® security window! All ForceField® security doors passed the test easily – all locking and hinging points were secure after the test.

Your Benefit

Even armed with a large screwdriver or similar, potential intruders won’t get past a ForceField® security door or window.

Pull test

The Test

Imagine an intruder trying to pull out your security screen…that’s what the pull test is all about. The security door or window must be able to withstand pulling forces of up to 2 kN (200 kg) for 20 seconds at various positions.

The Result

Passed. The mesh in a ForceField® security screen is so fine that there is nothing to grab. Even after the dynamic impact test and the jemmy test, there is no gap between mesh and frame on the ForceField® security doors and windows either. The test lab has nowhere to pull so the test is over before it begins.

Your Benefit

Good luck with trying to pull out a ForceField® security door or window. If the test lab can’t find anywhere to pull, a potential intruder has no hope.

Probe test

The Test

The probe test simulates an intruder having created a gap and trying to get his hand inside to unlock a door or a window. A deflecting force of 1.5 kN (150 kg) is applied to each opposite side of the opening to increase the space enough to get a hand through.

The Result

Passed. This test simply can't be performed on a ForceField® security door or window because the aperture in the mesh is less than 2 mm x 2 mm, far less than the test requirement of a 213 mm diameter probe.

Your Benefit

The mesh in ForceField® security doors and windows won’t allow an intruder to get his hand inside to unlock a door or a window.

Knife shear test

The Test

The knife shear test simulates a knife attack on your security screen. A heavy duty trimming knife is dragged along a 250 mm line with a force of 150 N (15 kg) vertically and up to 350 N (35 kg) horizontally. The test is repeated 3 times – each time with a new blade – along the same line.

The Result

Passed. To pass this Australian Standards test, continuous penetration of less than 150 mm is required. The knife shear test hardly leaves a scratch in a ForceField® security door or window.

Your Benefit

Even a strong burglar with a heavy duty trimming knife and 3 fresh blades won’t stand a chance of getting past a ForceField® security door or window.

Shear test

The Test

Cutting pliers are popular tools among burglars. The shear test simulates a cutting plier attack on a security screen. The shearing tool applies increasing pressure until the sample strand breaks. The force required to break one strand must be at least 3 kN (300 kg).

The Result

Passed. The test simply can’t be performed on a ForceField® security door or window because the mesh is too tightly woven for the pliers to get a hold. But – for the record – the average breaking point of a strand exceeds the standard by more than 60%.

Your Benefit

A potential intruder armed with cutting pliers will be disappointed with your choice of security screen. There’s no way the pliers will get a hold.